MONOGRAPH ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND ITS RELATED STUDIES IN THE CARIBBEAN : TRAFFICKING AND MONEY LAUNDERING

 
1)   SANDERS, Ronald. (1990). Drug problem : social and economic effects – policy options for the Caribbean. In Caribbean Affairs, 3(3), July-September, p.18-28.

Abstract: Discusses the problems of corruption and the threat to democratic institutions; drug abuse and a rise in crime; diversion of scarce resources to fight drug trafficking and drug abuse; and threats to the sovereign authority of Caribbean states by the manner in which the United States administration has sought to deal with the interdiction of drug traffickers and money laundering in the region.

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

2)   Agreement concerning co-operation in suppressing illicit maritime and air trafficking in narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances in the Caribbean Area. (2003). [S.l.]: [s.n.]. [92] p.

Abstract: Seeks to ensure that suspect vessels and suspect aircraft are detected, identified, continuously monitored, and where evidence of involvement in illicit traffic is found, suspect vessels are detained for appropriate law enforcement action by responsible law enforcement authorities

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

3) GRAHAM, Col. Linton H. (2007). Transnational Threats: Drug Trafficking and its Impact on International Security – The Caribbean perspective. In The UWI-CARICOM Project: Contributing to a viable Caribbean Community. Georgetown, Guyana: UWI-CARICOM Project.

Abstract: The paper defines and explores the complex web of issues and concerns related to the drug trade and its impacts on individual territories of the Caribbean, and on the Region taken as a whole. The intricate mosaic explored includes: drug use; drug trafficking; crime; poverty; affluence; arms; politics; corruption; high technology; complex financial structures and transactions; national and international power plays; the institutional framework for the maintenance of law and order; the macro economic effects on foreign cash flows, savings and investment; issues of national and international security; and impacts on foreign policy, diplomacy, and sovereignty.

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

4)   BROWN, Kathy-Ann. (1997). Shiprider model : an analysis of the U.S. proposed agreement concerning maritime counter-drug operations in its legal context. Cave Hill: U.W.I. Faculty of Law. ii, 80 p.

Abstract: Assesses the legal merits of the Shiprider Agreement. Looks at the nature and scope of the agreement; authorized US counter-drug operations and further contemplated actions; and the privileges and immunities of the US government and its forces. Focuses on some of the more troubling legal aspects of the agreement. Compares the Regional Security System with the Shiprider Agreement.

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

5)  Caribbean Drug Control Coordination Mechanism. (2000). Drugs in the Caribbean region 1999/2000 trends. Bridgetown, Barbados : CCM, 33 p. : maps

Abstract: Looks at cocaine trafficking through the Caribbean; heroin trafficking; marijuana production and trafficking; amphetamine-type drugs; and, the social and political effects of drugs of abuse.

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

6)   COWAL, Sally. (1994). Comment : battling the drug trade. In Caribbean Affairs, 7(1), March-April, p.3-6.

Abstract: The US Ambassador to Trinidad and Tobago expresses her concerns and appreciations of the relationship between the US government and the government of Trinidad and Tobago with respect to cooperation in the battle against illicit drugs.

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

7)   CUMBERBATCH, Janice A.; DUNCAN, Neville C. (1990). Illegal drugs, USA policies and Caribbean responses : the road to disaster. In Caribbean Affairs, 3(4), October-December, p.150-181.

Abstract: Presents case studies of legislation of Barbados, Jamaica and Montserrat in order that a picture of legal control of drugs in the Region be obtained. Describes Caribbean responses to USA policies to deal with the use of and trafficking in illegal drugs.

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

8)   GILMORE, William C. (1991). Drug trafficking by sea: the 1988 United Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances. Marine Policy, 15 (3), May.

Abstract: Examines the background to, and nature of, the central provisions of the Convention designed to promote and facilitate the interdiction of drug shipments by sea.

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

9) HAUGHTON, Suzette A. (2007). The Jamaica-Britain border and drug trafficking. In The Round Table, v. 96, no, 390.

Abstract: Analyzes the basis for a Jamaica-Britain border and examines the problems affecting this border. Demonstrates that Jamaican-British agreements have proven beneficial in curbing border problems across the Jamaica-Britain border region.

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

10)   HENKE, Holger W. (1998). Drugs in the Caribbean : the Shiprider controversy and the question of sovereignty. In European Review of Latin American and Caribbean studies, 1998, no. 64, p. 27-47.

Abstract: Attempts to demonstrate US and Caribbean perceptions of independence and sovereignty sharply diverged over the issue of counter-drug operations.

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

11)   ILLEGAL drug trade: excerpts from a global report by the US Government. (1994). In: Caribbean affairs, v. 7, (4), September/October, p.41-77.

Abstract: Notes that sustained cooperation over time is a key to results in the international anti-drug campaign. Points out that at the heart of the drug problem is the issue of government corruption. Presents an overview of drug trafficking in the Caribbean countries.

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

12)   LOWE-THORNE, Debra (2006). Anti-Drug Trafficking Agreements: Guyana’s Involvement. In Drug Trafficking: the Guyana Response. Excerpt from Thesis Research. Georgetown, University of Guyana Library (to be published in Transition Journal).

Abstract: Discusses how illicit drug use has forced regional and hemispheric governments to reconsider their attitude towards narcotic drug use and, to establish/re-establish appropriate channels of co-operation to confront and, ultimately remove, the narcotic threat. Identifies and discusses the Multilateral and Bilateral agreements signed by the Guyana Government as well as the new laws which were enacted. Before addressing the discourse on the Multilateral and Bilateral agreements, in terms of their politico-economic implications, their predecessors which provided the foundation for their being, were also examined.

Location: The Caribbean Research Library, University of Guyana Library.

13)   LOWE-THORNE, Debra (2006). Critical Assessment Of Guyana’s Response To Drug Trafficking And Drug Use. In Drug Trafficking: the Guyana Response. Georgetown, Guyana. Excerpt from Thesis Research. Georgetown, University of Guyana Library (to be published in Transition Journal).

Abstract: Discussed the Guyana government’s responses to the evolving drug problem within the framework of institutionalism. Identified those steps that the government has taken to either propose changes to organisational framework existent in Guyana or make such actual changes. Discussed the impact of the external influences regarding the changes made within the politico-economic environment so as to bring about a degree of equilibrium through changes in the behaviour of groups and organisations. Also, the legitimization of these changes by the Guyana government.

Location: The Caribbean Research Library, University of Guyana Library.

14) LOWE-THORNE, Debra (2002). Drug Trafficking: the Guyana Response. Greater Georgetown, The Caribbean Research Library, University of Guyana Library: p.155. Thesis: Presented to The University of Guyana for the Degree, Masters of Social Sciences.

Abstract: This study critically examines the drug trafficking agreements which the Guyana government has been a signatory. It addresses issues concerning attempts to control the production, trafficking and consumption of narcotic substances in Guyana. The focus, however, is an examination of the approaches adopted by the Guyana government in its attempt to control the movements and use of both narcotic substances and the wealth accumulated from such activities.

Further, the study examines the role of the key actors (with regard to these agreements) namely, the United Nations (UN), the administration of the United States of America (USA) and, the Organisation of American States (OAS) among others, in their involvement in the formulation of Guyana’s drug trafficking policies. Discusses the Bilateral and Multilateral Agreements which Guyana signed to gain space in the fight against an activity (drug trafficking), which is trans-national. In the process of collecting data, interviews were done with critical decision-makers. An examination of numerous documents pertinent to the study was also conducted. In the examination and presentation of findings, the researcher used techniques of

Location: The Caribbean Research Library, University of Guyana Library

15)   Organisation of American States. Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission. (2005). Final Report. Group of experts to control money laundering. April.

Abstract: An agenda and a review of items for the 2005-2006 work plan.

Location: National Drug Council, Trinidad & Tobago.

16)  PENFOLD, P.A. (1997). Fighting drugs in the Caribbean : a regional approach. In Courier, no.161, January-February, p.10-12.

Abstract: Brief review of the report by the EU team of drug experts. The team highlighted a number of gaps and weaknesses in the regional effort to combat the drugs problem, and made specific proposals on how to fill the gaps and overcome the weaknesses .

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

17)  PENFOLD, P.A. (1996). Fighting the drug problem in the Caribbean : a regional approach. In Bulletin of Eastern Caribbean affairs, 21, (3) Sept, p.47-51.

Abstract: Argues that the problems associated with drugs and drug present the greatest threat to stability, and economic and social development in the Caribbean, and are now undermining democracy in the Region. Discusses the work of the team of eight European Union Drug Experts which highlighted a number of significant gaps and weaknesses in the regional effort to combat the drug problem, and made specific practical proposals on how to fill these gaps and overcome these weaknesses.

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

18) RAMHARACK, Baytoram (1995). Drug trafficking and money laundering in the Caribbean 'mini'-states and dependent territories: the US response. In Round table, 335, July.

Abstract: Discusses the growing drug trade which has threatened the security of Caribbean states, many of which lack the manpower, technology and resources to offset the illicit trade. Identifies four steps which can encourage and strengthen anti-narcotics efforts in the region, viz. stronger Caribbean anti-narcotics agreements with the United States and international agencies and networks; the creation of drug enforcement units and more professional law enforcement institutions; suppression of money-laundering activities; and foreign aid and investment to bolster Caribbean economies.

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

19)  UNDCP Regional Meeting on Drug Control Cooperation in the Caribbean Report....(1996). New York : UN, 15 p. UNDCP Regional Meeting on Drug Control Cooperation in the Caribbean. Bridgetown, Barbados.

Abstract: Presents a plan of action for drug control coordination and cooperation in the Caribbean.

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

20) SEWARD, Valerie. (1993). Combating drugs trafficking and abuse: the challenge to Europe. London, GB : HMSO, [3], 45 p.

Abstract: No abstract available

Location: CARICOM Secretariat Documentation Centre.

 
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